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Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery Reviews

Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery

Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery

Embark on an enlightening journey of self-discovery with 78 new tarot spreads! From a simple 3-card layout to a complex arrangement of 34 cards, this marvelously illustrated volume shows how to gain a better understanding of yourself, your partner, your environment, and your problems. * Learn the meaning of each tarot card and how to use the Major and Minor Arcanas. * Find out your key card is based on your birthday (this card will always have personal meaning in your spreads). * Get layouts

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The Tarot Bible: The Definitive Guide to the Cards and Spreads

The Tarot Bible: The Definitive Guide to the Cards and Spreads

Starting with the basics—choosing the best pack, understanding the deck and its structure, asking the right questions—this comprehensive guide to working with Tarot provides all the information needed to do a full reading. On colorfully, sumptuously illustrated pages unfold the mysteries of each card’s symbolic meaning. From the Magician to the Fool, the Lovers to the Hermit, every beautifully presented entry features a picture of the card, as well as keywords and phrases, astrological affin

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COMPLETE BOOK OF TAROT SPREADS - BURGER, EVELIN/ FIEBIG, JOHANNES - NEW PAPERBAC

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New Tarot/Oracle/Runes Daily Spread Journal, spiral bound hardback
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5 comments on “Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery Reviews

  1. 9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Ok to begin with, June 22, 2001
    By 
    Sarah “mawkinberd” (Ruston, LA USA) –

    This review is from: Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery (Paperback)

    I have had the opportunity to work with several different books that collect tarot card readings in them. To its credit, this one is the strongest graphically. It has picture examples of many decks that I have not been able to find in the common market that are absolutely stunning visually and very nice to see. The book does have several nice layouts that are useful for people who are just starting out and would like to get some basic ideas. However, there really aren’t enough in the book to make it challenging or interesting to me, a person who has read for several years. Besides this, several of the readings don’t “read” well, and I have found them to be of limited use for me. I have not taken any one of the readings out of this text as inspiring enough to me for memorization, and I have gotten little inspiration for new layouts of my own, either. All in all, this book was not as strong as promised.

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  2. 9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    78 spreads – that’s one for every card!, April 28, 2003
    By 
    Bruce Gray “gurpsgm” (Shenandoah Valley, VA, USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery (Paperback)

    I happened to find a copy of “Illustrated Tarot Spreads” in a used book store recently, and I must say I wish I had sprung and bought a copy earlier.

    The main feature of this book are the 78 different Tarot card spreads in this book – that’s one for every card in the Tarot deck. That’s a lot of spreads, and thus you might find that some of them aren’t “right” for you.

    I’ve been reading a long time, and I generally use a “Tree of Life” spread when reading for my friends, and a “Celtic Cross” when reading for people I don’t know. But this book provides tools to read for both of those types of readings, as well as plenty in between.

    The authors start with an introduction to Tarot cards, as many books geared to beginners do. There’s a nice section about Using the Tarot properly, and an unusual section dealing with a “Sum of the Digits” card that might add a new facet to readings. Then there’s a short guide to interpreting meanings of cards, followed by a section that allows you to select your significator – your own personal Tarot card.

    Then we finally get into the meat of this book – the 78 different Tarot reading spreads. I found some of the beginning spreads such as the three card “Know Thyself” and the four card “Reaching the Goal” too simple for an in depth reading, but they might be OK for an answer to a simple question or a surface reading. There are two instances of using the Celtic Cross arrangement – one for your use on yourself and another with prompts for using it on others. There’s three occurrences of the “Tree of Life” layout I like to use – one labeled “as the Tarot sees it”, one labeled “of the seven levels”, and one labeled “My World”. The prompts for discovering the meanings of the cards in the layout are different for each, but I would have been happier had there only been one occurrence of each type of layout.

    One of my favorite sections was the Astrological signs. There are layouts for each sign of the Zodiac, as well as a general Astrological sign layout. Each includes ways to find out what each card means in that layout. I plan on using this to tailor my deeper readings of people I don’t know well based on their star sign.

    The book ends with a fantastic “Structure of Life” layout using 34 cards. Labeled “The Total Human Being”, it is broken down into easily digestible sections each dealing with a different facet of things that normally come up in readings. I am now using this layout for thorough readings for friends.

    This is a good book for beginners, and a fine book to add to the experienced Tarot Card reader’s library. If you want to do more than the “Celtic Cross” then this book is for you.

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  3. 8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Illustrated Tarot Spreads : 78 New Layouts for Personal Disc, March 30, 2000
    By 
    wendi@lactivist.com (California, USA) –

    This review is from: Illustrated Tarot Spreads: 78 New Layouts For Personal Discovery (Paperback)

    This is an excellent book for anyone. If you are just starting out or an accomplished reader, this is a great resource to have on hand. It can be used with any Tarot deck. The book covers many different issues and has more spreads than any book I have seen. A must for anyone serious about Tarot.

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  4. 47 of 50 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    “The Definitive Guide” bit is overreaching…, August 24, 2007
    By 
    quiet0ne (Sparks, NV) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Tarot Bible: The Definitive Guide to the Cards and Spreads (Paperback)

    I bought this book with the hopes of supplementing my small library of tarot books. If this had been my first book on tarot, perhaps my feelings would be different about it. In my opinion, Sarah Bartlett presents both good and bad material, but enough bad that I’m fairly disappointed.

    First, what I don’t like.

    1) The card descriptions, being the meat of the book, have barely more content then the LWBs (little white books) for most decks. Cards are given one brief paragraph of general description, then two or three paragraphs of what the card would mean if it appears in certain spread positions. Example, for Rider-Waite-Smith’s The Empress: “If you draw this card in a ‘future outcome’ position, you can be assured of progress in any plan, however daunting it may seem.” It is very formulistic, almost the sorts of descriptions you would expect to hear from a quack tarot reader on TV.

    2) The author ignores reversals, and forces her readers/students to do so as well. She does go into brief detail about how reversals are used (that the card is “blocked” or the energy is undeveloped, etc). However, she then goes on to explain why she personally doesn’t use reversed cards, how “the rich symbolism of the upright cards will tell you what is lacking…” This would be an acceptable statement to make if tarot symbolism was actually covered within the book. Unfortunately, the work falls on your shoulders to decipher the symbolism through intuition and guesswork, with little to no guidance on her part.

    A note here: I understand that using reversed cards is a highly controversial topic among readers. I personally don’t utilize reversals myself, due to doing exactly what Bartlett suggests. Yet I study extensively and have used reversals in the past. My gripe with her method is how she ignores the option completely (even encourages you to turn any reversed cards around in a reading), which I feel would hurt a new student to tarot.

    3) The only deck covered extensively in this book is RWS. There are reviews covering a few other decks, but all other information given is based on RWS. For a work claiming to be “definitive,” the omission of other decks is bothersome and limiting.

    Now, what I do like about this book.

    1) There is a nice collection of spreads, which are broken into categories of Everyday, Relationship, Revelation, and Destiny. Each spread also has an example reading and how the author would interpret it.

    2) Some basic information is listed about astrology, numerology, crystals, colors, kaballah, and meditation techniques. All of this can be found for free online, but it’s a nice option to have it all in one volume.

    3) Decent size, layout, and print quality. Not your typical black-and-white-on-cheap-newsprint book. Everything is in full color and a nice resolution so you can really see the cards. The small size (5.5 inches by 6.5 inches) makes it easy to carry in a purse while remaining discrete.

    Overall, I get the strong feeling that this book is slanted at potential women tarot readers who are put off by plain-looking (but better written) tarot books found on store shelves. For new tarot students, as long as this book is purchased as a companion to a meatier, albeit drier work (such as Rachel Pollack’s Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom ), this is good for taking with you for readings away from home as you get familiar with the cards. As a stand-alone source of information, this will barely get your feet wet.

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  5. 14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    An excellent primer, August 21, 2008
    By 
    Ronaldinho (Los Angeles, CA United States) –

    This review is from: The Tarot Bible: The Definitive Guide to the Cards and Spreads (Paperback)

    While this book probably doesn’t have the detail to help advanced readers, it’s an excellent primer for someone getting started.

    The main area where this book shines is in the card descriptions. Unlike Bunning (who gives masses of indigestible bullet points) or Greer, who sometimes gets bogged down in paragraphs of detail, Bartlett does a great job of mixing prose and bullet points. An image of the card (from a RWS-inspired deck) and a list of key ideas makes each card’s meaning very accessible, while 3-4 paragraphs of detailed guidance help you find more sophisticated meanings and understand what the card could mean in various contexts.

    Bartlett also does a good job of explaining the meanings of both the suits and the numbers, giving the student a solid foundation in figuring out meanings even when you don’t remember exactly what that particular card is supposed to mean. Her writing is clear and concise – enough detail to ground you without drowning you.

    The book is not without faults, however. Bartlett is somewhat dismissive of reversed cards. This may be a wise choice for the beginning reader, but her treatment of the subject will be far too superficial for those who want to delve into that area. (Greer’s “Tarot Reversals” would be a good addition to the library for people who care about reversals, but it’s much less approachable than this book.)

    Also, Bartlett throws a lot of spreads at the reader, and the book could probably benefit by being more selective in that area. While it’s nice that she supplies “daily spreads” “relationship spreads” “revelation spreads” and “destiny spreads,” the result is a little unfocused. WIth 40 spreads, how could it not be? Cutting the number of spread in half (or more) and giving more examples would have improved this book.

    But really the meat of any book on the tarot is the card descriptions, and Bartlett provides the best organized section for really learning that material, with the best mix of depth and easily-assimilated detail, that I’ve seen.

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